Will tar be tarnishing South Florida’s beautiful beaches and threatening our local economy? Pensacola and other Florida coastal communities are already experiencing damages from the greatest oil spill in U.S. history.

 

Deepwater Horizon, an offshore oil drilling platform located in the Gulf of Mexico near Louisiana, exploded into flames on Tuesday, April 20, 2010, and sank two days later. The rig was owned by Transocean Ltd., and operated under contract to international oil giant BP.

 

South Florida officials and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection are closely monitoring movement of contaminated Gulf waters.

 

Oil from the BP spill may travel around the southern tip of Florida and up the east coast to North Carolina, according to one simulation published by scientists at the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The actual route taken by the estimated 630,000 barrels of oil spilled into the Gulf will depend on many weather conditions, including the Gulf’s Loop Current, winds, and potential hurricane activity.

 

Significant risks to the South Florida economy will result if tar does reach our pristine beaches. The economic impact may be felt by hotel workers, restaurant employees, tourism operators, fishermen, the boating industry, and many other sectors of our tourism and hospitality-sensitive economy.

 

Contact Lawlor Winston, LLP

 

If you or someone you love is at risk of injury or loss as a result of the BP oil spill, talk to the Fort Lauderdale personal injury attorneys at Lawlor Winston, LLP (www.lawlorwinston.com). You can reach us at 954-525-2345 for a free consultation.

Shares 0